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  • Return to play after shoulder instability in National Football League athletes

    HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that National Football League (NFL) players sustaining a shoulder destabilizing injury could return to play (RTP) successfully at a high rate regardless of treatment type.
    METHODS: We identified and evaluated 83 NFL players who sustained an in-season shoulder instability event while playing in the NFL. NFL RTP, incidence of surgery, time to RTP, recurrent instability events, seasons/games played after the injury, and demographic data were collected. Overall RTP was determined, and players who did and did not undergo operative repair were compared.

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  • Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block Does Not Cause Long-Term Strength and Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PURPOSE: To determine if patients treated with a single-shot femoral nerve block have strength and functional deficits at 9-month follow-up.
    METHODS: Forty-three patients who underwent primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions were randomized to receive either a preoperative single-shot femoral nerve block or local infiltration anesthesia for primary pain control. All patients underwent a standardized comprehensive rehabilitation program postoperatively. Isokinetic strength and function was tested using a Biodex machine at 9 months or more postoperatively comparing the operative and nonoperative extremity.

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  • Cutibacteriumacnes Septic Arthritis of the Nonoperated Knee: A Case Report

    Abstract Cutibacterium (Propionibacterium) acnes , a gram-positive bacillus with low pathogenicity, is an uncommon but known cause of prosthetic joint infections, particularly related to shoulder surgery. C. acnes , however, is an extremely rare pathogen in the nonoperated knee joint. This report details an uncommon case of C. acnes septic knee arthritis after multiple intra-articular steroid injections in a 56-year-old male patient. After an indolent presentation and late diagnosis, the patient underwent surgical debridement with IV antibiotic management. This case illustrates that intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the management of osteoarthritis are not without risk.

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  • Amount of Minutes Played Does Not Contribute to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in National Basketball Association Athletes

    Abstract There is limited information on the potential risk factors for sustaining an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear in National Basketball Association (NBA) athletes. This study evaluated 83 NBA players who sustained an ACL injury between 1984 and 2015 to determine the influence of minutes played on injury risk. Minutes played in the injury game, during the season, and over their career were assessed, along with the ability to return to play, player efficiency rating, and playing time after return.

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  • Return to Play After Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in National Football League Players

    BACKGROUND: National Football League (NFL) players who undergo anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been shown to have a lower return to play (RTP) than previously expected. However, RTP in the NFL after revision ACL reconstruction (RACLR) is not well defined.
    PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of this study is to determine the RTP of NFL players after RACLR and evaluate factors that predict RTP. Our hypothesis was that more experienced and established players would be more likely to RTP after RACLR.

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  • Major League pitching workload after primary ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction and risk for revision surgery

    BACKGROUND: Literature has attempted to correlate pitching workload with risk of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury; however, limited data are available in evaluating workload and its relationship with the need for revision reconstruction in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers.

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  • Characterization of Rotator Cuff Tears: Ultrasound Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Abstract Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are both capable of diagnosing full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, it is unknown which imaging modality is more accurate and precise in evaluating the characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a surgical population. This study reviewed 114 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear over a 1-year period. Of these patients, 61 had both preoperative MRI and ultrasound for review.

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  • Pain Assessment After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Versus Hamstring Tendon Autograft

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common outpatient procedure that is accompanied by significant postoperative pain.
    PURPOSE: To determine differences in acute pain levels between patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) versus hamstring tendon (HS) autograft.

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  • Radiostereometric Evaluation of Tendon Elongation After Distal Biceps Repair

    BACKGROUND: Operative repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures has shown successful outcomes. However, little is known about the amount of tendon or repair site lengthening after repair.
    PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate distal biceps tendon repair via intratendinous radiostereometric analysis to analyze tendon lengthening at different time intervals of healing. The hypothesis was that there is significant lengthening after repair.

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  • Liposomal bupivacaine versus interscalene nerve block for pain control after shoulder arthroplasty: a prospective randomized trial

    HYPOTHESIS: Our hypothesis was that in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty, a prospective randomized trial would find no significant differences in average daily pain scores of those treated with interscalene nerve block (INB) vs. local liposomal bupivacaine (LB).
    METHODS: Sixty patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroplasty were assessed for eligibility. Study arms included either intraoperative local infiltration of LB (20 mL bupivacaine/20 mL saline) or preoperative INB, with a primary outcome of postoperative average daily visual analog scale scores for 4 days. Secondary outcomes assessed included opioid consumption, length of stay, and complications. Randomization was by a computerized algorithm. Only the observer was blinded to the intervention.

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